Eric D. Isaacs

Executive Vice President for Research, Innovation and
National Laboratories

The Robert A. Millikan Distinguished Service Professor in Physics

Edward H. Levi Hall, Suite 601
5801 S. Ellis Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
Phone: 773.702.1383
Fax: 773.834.9199
isaacs@uchicago.edu

Executive Assistant:
Cynthia Sullivan
773.702.9476 
clsullivan@uchicago.edu

Eric D. Isaacs is the Executive Vice President for Research, Innovation and National Laboratories at the University of Chicago, serves as CEO of UChicago Argonne, LLC, Vice-Chairman of the Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory and is a member of the Boards for Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the Marine Biological Laboratory.  

Isaacs provides direct oversight of Argonne and Fermilab for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, the MBL affiliation, and the University’s founding-partner relationship with the Giant Magellan Telescope project.  He also oversees University research administration, safety, and computing; technology development and new ventures; and numerous endeavors in science and innovation that cut across divisions, schools, and institutes.  His responsibilities include furthering the University’s efforts in computation, data science, and innovation in Hyde Park, including the Polsky Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the Chicago Innovation Exchange.

Isaacs, the Robert A. Millikan Distinguished Service Professor in Physics, previously served as Provost of the University of Chicago from 2014-2016 after serving for five years as Director of Argonne, one of the nation's largest science and engineering research centers, which has been managed by the University since 1946. A condensed matter physicist whose work focuses on quantum materials, Isaacs joined the University and Argonne in 2003 as the founding director of the Center for Nanoscale Materials, after working for 15 years at Bell Laboratories, including terms as director of semiconductor physics research and materials physics research.

Isaacs holds a Ph.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a bachelor's degree from Beloit College. He is author or co-author of more than 150 scholarly publications—most recently, a paper on the impacts of advanced battery technologies on energy and the environment.

Related Links: